Wow! This latest condom is very strong, it cant be punctured with a needle

We are in the tech age were newer versions of products keep coming out with latest innovations and research. What is new yesterday becomes outdated today with constant evolution and improved effectiveness. Each year, we see newer versions of iphones, android phones, TVs and electronic gadgets being released to the market. We all crave for this latest versions which are usually better than the older versions. However, there has never been an upgrade on a product almost everyone uses, and that is CONDOM!

Well, there is now an upgraded version of CONDOM that is structurally re-engineered as one of the first major advances in condom technology since the reservoir tip was added almost 70 years ago. The name of the CONDOM is LELO HEX

USP_HEX_condoms

LELO HEX condom was Launched by LELO,whose engineers spent seven years to develop it.

According to the founder, Filip Sedec, “The challenge was to make something radically different with a material already approved for condom use.We did this because people need to be having great, safe sex today, not ten years from now.”

Why hexagons? It turns out this seven-sided shape is among the most durable under pressure and seep-resistant, as represented in nature.

“There’s a reason why honeycombs are the shape they are, and why snake scales move the way they do. It’s because hexagons are strong, symmetrical, and tessellate perfectly,” Sedec explained. “They’re one of nature’s go-to shapes for anything needing to be at once lightweight, and incredibly strong. That’s why the structure of Graphene – the thinnest, strongest material we know of today is … you guessed it, hexagonal.”

Unlike others on the market, HEX condoms feature a honeycomb hexagonal lattice. Each HEX condom integrates 350 small hexagons through its latex surface, resulting in effective performance.

The extremely thin hexagonal panels also flex and mold to the wearer. It’s more forgiving of friction and stress, preventing the latex from tearing, LELO claims. Even when repeatedly poked with a needle, the taut HEX doesn’t rip—trust me, I tried!

The hexagonal ridge is on the inside of the condom is a big reason why the condom is less flimsy — it acts like a tire on water, gripping and flexing with the penis. The poked hole stays within the hexagonal cell and doesn’t rip the entire latex condom.

Why should you care?
In America, condom use is dropping significantly, while STIs are on the rise. In fact, the largest-ever nationwide study on sexuality in 2010 found that only 1 in 4 acts of vaginal intercourse are protected by condoms in the U.S., according to Indiana University.

Americans aren’t ditching “no glove, no love” because condoms are hard to find; rather, it’s due to physical appeal. A 2007 study surveying hundreds of college students published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior found that men and women who reported unprotected sex as more pleasurable were less likely to use condoms.

But 20 million people contract STIs annually in the U.S., though only half are aware. Meanwhile, 49% of U.S. pregnancies were unintended.

These dangerous realities make condom innovation not only important, but essential.

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